Biomimicry

Energy efficiency inspired by nature

Human-made products based on beehives, whales, and seashells could generate $1.6 trillion of gross domestic product globally by 2030.

Let nature move you

The seashells you collect or the beehive constructed under the eaves could be the inspiration needed to build the next energy efficient home. Nature has been finding energy-related solutions for millions of years, and intentionally looking to nature for inspired solutions for our own energy problems is called biomimicry. For example, the Wright Brothers famously studied the flight mechanisms of birds for inspiration in their design of the airplane. They didn’t copy the flapping of wings, but instead focused on the control of flight by wing-shape modification. Sales of biomimicry-based products and architectural projects have generated over $1.5 billion in revenue in previous years. Encouraging inventors and entrepreneurs to bring technologies inspired by biomimicry from concept to market can help usher in a whole new world of production that is environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

 

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Energy Storage Program

Engaging individuals and organizations involved in building, installing, integrating, or researching energy storage technology.

Advanced Buildings Program

Developing energy-efficient, building-related technology, including next-generation HVAC and smart building technologies, and business models for residential, multifamily, and commercial buildings.

 
 

See It in Action

 

Straight out of Alice in Wonderland: a house made of mushrooms

Ecovative Design developed a process to manufacture insulation and packing foam made from mushroom by-products. The nature-inspired invention is not only environmentally friendly, but fire resistant and self-sealing. From insulation for tiny houses to cars, this innovator is taking biomimicry to the next level.

 

Visit: ecovativedesign.com (biomimicry example)

 

Get Advice

Dana Levy
518-862-1090 x3377
 
 

Research & Technical Reports

Visit: asknature.org

Visit: biomimicry.net

Visit: biomimicry.org

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