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National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Program

 

The federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act was signed into law on November 15, 2021 and established the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Program. NEVI will provide funding to states to deploy electric vehicle (EV) fast chargers along designated electric vehicle corridors to establish an interconnected EV charging network across the state and nation.

NEVI and New York

The New York State Department of Transportation will receive approximately $175 million through NEVI over five years. The NEVI program requires funds to be invested within one travel mile of designated EV corridors, with charging stations no more than 50 miles apart. New York State’s designated corridors include many of the State’s most-traveled interstate and state highways.

To receive the NEVI funds, the New York State Department of Transportation must submit a State EV Infrastructure Deployment Plan (Plan) to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) by August 1, 2022. The Plan will contain information on the State’s existing charging infrastructure, goals for the investments, how the State plans to use the funding, and how the State will monitor and evaluate the program. Public input is an important part of Plan development. FHWA will review and approve these plans by September 30, 2022.  States will be eligible to start spending the funds once their plans are approved.

Share Your Input

New York State will provide the public and interested parties with regular, transparent, and effective access to information and decision-making.

Please provide your initial input on priorities for charging locations and amenities through this short survey Link opens in new window - close new window to return to this page.. All submissions will be considered in the project planning and development process.

You can also sign up to receive future program updates and notices of outreach and engagement opportunities.

New York State electric vehicle corridors for charging station installations

Download the Full New York State Corridor Map Now [GIF]

Description: This map shows the interstates and highways statewide that are designated electric vehicle corridors:

  • New York City Metro Area
    • Interstate 84 – Port Jervis to Connecticut border
    • Interstate 684 – NY-22 to Interstate 287
    • Interstate 95 – New Jersey border to Connecticut border
    • Interstate 495 – Manhattan to Riverhead
    • Interstate 278 – New Jersey border to Interstate 95
    • Interstate 678 – Interstate 95 to JFK Airport
    • Interstate 287 – New Jersey border to Interstate 95
    • NY-25 – Manhattan to Orient
    • NY-27 – Interstate 278 to Montauk
  • Eastern New York
    • Interstate 87 – Canada border to Albany
    • Interstate 87 – Albany to New York City
    • Interstate 90 – Syracuse to Albany
  • Central and Western New York
    • Interstate 90 – Pennsylvania border to Buffalo
    • Interstate 90 – Buffalo to Syracuse
    • Interstate 81 – Canada border to Syracuse
    • Interstate 81 – Syracuse to Pennsylvania border
    • Interstate 390 – Rochester to Interstate 86
    • Interstate 86 – Pennsylvania border to Elmira
    • Interstate 86/NY-17 – Elmira to Interstate 87
    • Interstate 88 – Interstate 81 to Interstate 90
    • NY-13 – NY-17 to Interstate 81

The Interstate highways that are designated corridors and are shown on this map are:

  • I-81 from the Pennsylvania border southeast of Binghamton, north-northwest to Cortland where is it joined by NY 13 and then north to Syracuse. I-81 continues northward through Watertown and then turns northwesterly approximately 17 miles north of Watertown and continues on to the Canadian border at Alexandria.
  • I-84 from the Pennsylvania/New Jersey border near Port Jervis New York northeasterly to Middletown, then west for approximately 26 miles when it turns southeast and enters Connecticut near Danbury, Connecticut.
  • I-86 from the western border of New York and Pennsylvania near Ripley east-northeast to the junction with I-390 and then southeasterly through Bath to Elmira. I-86 then goes south-south easterly to Binghamton and continues for approximately 29 miles where it joins NY 17.
  • I-87 begins in New York City and follows the eastern shore of the Hudson River to Tarrytown where it crosses the Hudson River on the Mario Cuomo Bridge and continues easterly to Suffern, New York. Near Suffern I-87 turns north and follows the Hudson River through Albany and continues northward through Plattsburgh to the Canadian border.
  • I-88 begins near Binghamton and runs northeasterly to the vicinity of Schenectady.
  • I-90 begins at the Pennsylvania border near Ripley and follows the lakefront of Lake Erie to Buffalo. North of Buffalo it joins with I-190 but also turns east and passes south of Rochester, continues to Syracuse, Utica, Amsterdam, and Albany and then proceeds southeast to the Massachusetts border.
  • I-95 runs from the Connecticut border near Port Chester south along Long Island Sound to the Bronx portion of New York City and then turns west and crosses the Bronx (this section is called the Cross Bronx Expressway), continues across the northern portion of Manhattan to the George Washington Bridge and on to New Jersey.
  • I-190 begins north of Buffalo at its junction with I-90 and continues northwesterly approximately 22 miles to the Canadian border.
  • I-287 starts at the junction with I-95 near Rye and continues west-north westerly to Tarrytown where it joins I-87 and the Mario Cuomo Bridge.
  • I-390 starts at its junction with I-490 north of Rochester and proceeds south to I90 and then continues south approximately 20 miles and turns southeasterly and continues until it joins I-390 north of Bath.
  • I-490 starts at its junction with I-90 approximately 45 miles east of Buffalo and proceeds northeasterly to the northern portion of Rochester, joins I-390 and continues south easterly to I-90.
  • I-495 Begins in New York City in the middle of Queens at continues east-northeasterly to Riverhead, in the eastern third of Long Island
  • I-684 begins at its junction with I-84 near Brewster and continues south to I-87 near Rye, New York.

The non-Interstate highways that are designated corridors are:

  • NY 13 from Elmira where it joins I-86 northeast to Ithaca and continuing on northeasterly to I-81 at Cortland
  • NY 17 begins approximately 29 miles east of Binghamton and continues southeasterly to I-84 approximately 10 miles southeast of Middleton and continues east-southeasterly to where it joins I-87 near Harriman.
  • NY 25 begins in the northeastern part of Queens, New York City at its junction with I-495, and goes east, crosses underneath I-495 near Hicksville and parallels I-495 to Riverhead, Long Island
  • NY 27 begins at its junction with I-278 in south Brooklyn, New York City and proceeds along the Atlantic Ocean coastline to Montauk, at the extreme eastern point of Long Island.
New York City designated electric vehicle corridors

Download the Full NYC Corridor Map Now [GIF]

Description: This map shows the interstates and highways in the New York City area that are designated electric vehicle corridors:

  • Interstate 84 – Port Jervis to Connecticut border
  • Interstate 684 – NY-22 to Interstate 287
  • Interstate 95 – New Jersey border to Connecticut border
  • Interstate 495 – Manhattan to Riverhead
  • Interstate 278 – New Jersey border to Interstate 95
  • Interstate 678 – Interstate 95 to JFK Airport
  • Interstate 287 – New Jersey border to Interstate 95
  • NY-25 – Manhattan to Orient
  • NY-27 – Interstate 278 to Montauk

The Interstate highways that are designated corridors that are shown on this map are:

  • I-87 is at the top of the map and starts near Suffern and continues east where it meets the Mario Cuomo Bridge over the Hudson River.
  • I-95 Begins at the Connecticut border at Port Chester and follows the Long Island Sound cost to the Bronx in New York City and then turns west, crosses the Bronx and norther portion of Manhattan and joins the George Washington Bridge at the Hudson River.
  • I-278 begins at the Goethals Bridge in Staten Island at the New Jersey border and continues easterly to the Verrazano Narrows Bridge and then northeasterly along the Brooklyn shore, has a junction with NY 27 and continues northeasterly into Queens, over the Kosciusko Bridge then turns north westerly and joins the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (formerly the Tri-Borough Bridge) and then continues north easterly across the south Bronx to its junction with I-95 and I-678 in the western portion of the Bronx.
  • I-495 begins at the Queens waterfront and continues north easterly, crossing NY 25 near Hicksville and continuing to the map border
  • I-678 begins at JFK International Airport in southeast Queens and continues northwesterly to the norther border of Queens, meets the Whitestone Bridge and continues northwesterly to its junction with I-95 and I-278.
  • I-684 begins at the northern border of the map near the center and continues south for about 3 miles to I-287.

The non-Interstate highways that are designated corridors and are shown on this map are:

  • NY 25 starts at its junction with I-495 in Queens, continues east-southeast to its junction with I-678 then turns northeasterly and continues to the map border
  • NY 27 starts at its junction with I-278 near the Brooklyn waterfront and continues easterly along the Atlantic coast of Long Island to the map border. 

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