Energy Storage in New York

New York State has some of the most aggressive energy and climate goals in the country, including:

  • The Clean Energy Standard, a mandate to get 50% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2030, with a proposed expansion to 70%
  • A proposed target of 100% carbon-free electricity by 2040
  • A 40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 (using 1990 as a baseline)
  • Saving 185 trillion BTUs (British Thermal units) in end-use energy by 2030 through greater efficiency

Energy storage will play a crucial role in meeting these our State’s ambitious goals. Storage will help to integrate clean energy into the grid, reduce costs associated with meeting peak electric demands, and increase efficiency. Additionally, energy storage can stabilize supply during peak electric usage and help keep critical systems online during an outage.

All of this while creating an industry that could employ 30,000 New Yorkers by 2030.

Find energy storage systems in New York State and access performance data from projects supported by NYSERDA on the Distributed Energy Resources Integrated Data Systems mapLink opens in new window - close new window to return to this page..

On the Path to 2030

In 2018, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced a nation-leading goal of 1,500 Megawatts (MW) of energy storage by 2025. NYSERDA and the New York State Department of Public Service (DPS), together with stakeholders, developed the New York State Energy Storage RoadmapLink opens in new window - close new window to return to this page.. The Roadmap identified the most promising near-term policies, regulations, and initiatives needed to realize the Governor’s ambitious 2025 target on a path to a 2030 storage target.

In December 2018, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) issued a landmark energy storage orderLink opens in new window - close new window to return to this page., based upon the Roadmap recommendations. The order established a 3,000 MW by 2030 energy storage goal and deployment mechanisms to achieve both the 2025 and 2030 energy storage targets and focuses on:

  • Improving the overall efficiency of the system by stimulating third-party investment
  • Uncovering and rewarding locational and time-of-day values
  • Spurring the pace of cost-reduction and efficiencies by seeking markets at scale and promoting competition
  • Removing impediments to accessing finance as well as data that highlights areas of the grid with the greatest need for the benefits of storage
  • Authorizing a total $350 million in bridge incentives to accelerate the energy storage market, including funding for solar-plus-storage projects within the NY-Sun initiative, plus another $53 million RGGI funds
  • Directing the New York’s six investor-owned utilities to hold competitive procurements for a minimum of 350 MW of bulk-sited energy storage
  • Regulatory changes to customer rates and utility solicitations that reflect the environmental benefits and resiliency energy storage brings to the grid
  • Recommendations to improve wholesale market design and enable distributed energy resources to meet distribution system and wholesale system needs more cost effectively for ratepayers
  • Continued efforts to streamline permitting and siting challenges, reduce the non-hardware costs of energy storage, and ensure straightforward access to market rules and opportunities

Stakeholders may find the summary slide deck of the Order presented by NYSERDA and DPS [PDF] as a useful resource.

On April 25, 2019, NYSERDA filed its approved implementation planLink opens in new window - close new window to return to this page. with the PSC that outlines the details of the incentive structure and design that will be used to support the incentive programs. The implementation plan adopts the foundational commitment of the energy storage order and aims to create a self-sustaining energy storage market over time.