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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Potential Studies

Heat Pumps Potential for Energy Savings in New York State - Final Report - July 2014

Heat Pumps Potential for Energy Savings in New York State [PDF]

This report provides an assessment of the potential for energy savings from heat pumps in New York State. This assessment builds on work reported in the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Potential Study of New York State.

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Potential Study of New York State – April 2014

This study presents the potential for increased adoption of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in New York State. It focuses on the long-term potential using a twenty-year study period, 2013–2032. Energy efficiency and renewable energy potential is reported statewide as well as separately for four regional zones (Long Island, New York City, Hudson Valley, and Upstate). Energy efficiency potential is estimated for electricity, natural gas, and petroleum fuels in the building and industrial sectors. Renewable energy potential is estimated for biomass, hydro, solar, and wind, and is also estimated for the buildings sector and electric generation sector. Overall, the study finds that large amounts of energy efficiency and renewable energy potential exist through the study period.

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Resource Development Potential in New York State - Final Report - August 2003

Volume One: Summary Report [PDF]

NYSERDA commissioned this study of the long-range potential for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to displace fossil-fueled electricity in New York. The study examined the potential available from existing and emerging efficiency technologies and practices to lower end-use electricity requirements in residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. The study also estimated renewable electricity generation potential from biomass, fuel cells, hydropower, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, solar, and wind. The study assessed New York's efficiency and renewable potential over three time horizons: five years (through 2007), 10 years (through 2012), and 20 years (through 2022).

Last Updated: 11/17/2014